55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex

55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex

Summary of interview

Patient Scenario:

55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex

 

As noted in Seidels Physical Examination book, to prevent misinterpretations and misrepresentations, practitioners must make every effort to see the world of the individual patient as the patient sees it (Ball et al., 2019). Each patient is unique, with unique circumstances and our first meeting with a patient helps to set the tone for the relationship (Ball et al., 2019). Both physical and emotional comfort is needed for effective communication, as well as carefully crafting your patient questions to ensure your patient responds effectively to you (Ball et al., 2019). Our communication with each patient differs based on their present needs, and comfort. As illustrated by Ball, establishing a positive patient relationship depends on communication built on courtesy, comfort, connection, and confirmation (Ball et al., 2019) 55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex.

My patient is a 55-year-old Asian woman living in a high-density population complex. Using the courtesy, comfort, connection, and confirmation framework for our interview, I addressed my patient formally, learned her name and respected her need for modesty including if she wanted others, such as another family member, friend, or woman in the room as well (Ball et al., 2019). Additionally, since my patient would be identified as an older adult with possible change in cognitive abilities, memory, and personality I wanted her to feel as comfortable as possible and ensure the settings in the room would not magnify any possible issues (Ball et al., 2019). I used this technique to ensure she felt comfortable with me. I allowed the patient to speak freely, giving her time to absorb the situation and decide how much she wanted to divulge. Since I was not clear on how comfortable she would feel with a lot of eye contact, I asked her what would make her feel more comfortable and allowed her to guide us down this discussion.

As noted above, my patient is an older woman living in high density public housing complex and because of that my first questions were focused on her home or living conditions, which included number of people she was living with, types of furnishing, and any pets (Ball et al., 2019). Additionally, I asked her about family, her occupation to determine if there were any additional risks identified, travel, and access to care including transportation and health insurance coverage (Ball et al., 2019). Through this interview, I was able to get a glimpse into her day-to-day life and emotional health.

 

The Risk Assessment Tool

Each patient is assessed based on information gathered during the interview process by using open ended question. My patient lives in a high-density complex and could be at risk of falling and not getting the proper care that she needs, in a reasonable time (Adly et al., 2019). As a practitioner, one would evaluate how she is getting around and access to health care. An understanding of this would lead to developing a plan of care that can help meet the need of the patient 55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex.

 

Targeted Questions

It is important to ask the right questions and utilize open ended question to further insight to patient for various risk factors such as fall, abuse, and malnutrition. To develop a tailored care plan for my patient based on her age, socioeconomic status, I would ask the following questions:

1. What is your current employment status?

2. What is your day to day like?

3. What time do you wake up and what type of meals do you normally like to eat?

4. Do you live with family? If not, how often do you visit family or does family visit you?

5. How do you feel?

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6. Are you currently taking any medication?

7. Do you have access to transportation?

8. Do you like to participate in any physical activities?

10. What’s your insurance status?

11. When was the last time you had a doctor visit? 55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex

Reference

Adly, N. N., Abd-El-Gawad, W. M., &Abou-Hashem, R. M. (2019). Relationship between malnutrition and different fall risk assessment tools in a geriatric in-patient unit. Aging Clinical and experimental Research, 32 (7), 1279- 1287.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-019-01309-0

Ball, J.W., Dains, J.E., Flynn, J. A, Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2019). Seidel’s guide to physical examination: An interprofessional approach (9th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby

response

Thank you for your discussion, it was very informative and descriptive. I agree, it is important to be non-judgmental and use open ended questions to communicate with a teenager.  Communication, giving and receiving information, in general can be challenging. Some techniques to improve communication are increasing cultural awareness and understanding of various life experiences and cultures, developing empathy and compassion for people, being aware of one’s own body language and paying attention to the patient’s/other’s body language (Raypole, 2020) 55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex.

The female in your case study is a 16-year-old female, which makes her at a higher risks of contracting a sexually transmitted infection. According to the CDC, youth between the ages of 15 and 24 make up half of the 26 million new sexually transmitted infections that occurred in United States. Furthermore, in the United States, 12.7% of sexually active adolescents and young adults who are on their parent’s health insurance won’t seek sexual and reproductive healthcare for fear that their parents would find out (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2021).

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, April 8). Adolescents and young adults. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/std/life-stages-populations/adolescents-youngadults.htm.

Raypole, C. (2020, January 16). 19 communication techniques to add to your arsenal. Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health/communication-techniques#body-language 55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex.

response 2

Thank you for your discussion, I found it very informative. I agree using the courtesy, comfort, connection, and confirmation approach would be beneficial in commutating and building a rapport with your patient. Communication, giving and receiving information, in general can be challenging. Some techniques to improve communication are increasing cultural awareness and understanding of various life experiences and cultures, developing empathy and compassion for people, being aware of one’s own body language and paying attention to the patient’s/other’s body language (Raypole, 2020).

There are health risks associated with high density housing such as infectious diseases like STDs, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and diarrhea and noncommunicable diseases like heart disease, stroke, asthma and other respiratory illnesses, cancers, diabetes and depression (World Health Organization, 2021). Also, studies reveal that high density housing environments has an impact on respiratory health, because of poor air quality, and physical activity (Chen et al., 2019).

References

Chen, R., Li, X., Sun, W., Wang, L., & Yang, X. (2019, December 30). Impact of high-density urban built environment on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A case study of Jing’an district, shanghai. International journal of environmental research and public health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6982330/ 55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex.

Raypole, C. (2020, January 16). 19 communication techniques to add to your arsenal. Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health/communication-techniques#body-language.

World Health Organization. (2021). Urban health. World Health Organization. https://www.who.int/health-topics/urban-health 55-year-old Asian female living in a high-density public housing complex.