Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses Advanced Nursing Research Essay

Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses Advanced Nursing Research Essay

Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses

Qualitative research studies differ greatly from quantitative, though sometimes both are combined as a mixed-research study. To start, qualitative studies ask broad questions that will eventually divide into sub-questions, whereas quantitative studies determine specific variables within their hypothesis (Creswell, 2009, p. 129). Qualitative researchers will determine their area of study (ie. perceived benefits of art therapy in vulnerable children) and obtain subjective data from a determined sample size. In a study titled, “Benefits of an Arts-Based Mindfulness Group Intervention for Vulnerable Children,” researchers utilized a mixed-method design and first questioned children between the ages of 8-12 involved with child welfare and mental health services about how art therapy made them feel (Coholic and Eys, 2016). This is a qualitative process to first identify potential sub-questions that would then lead to a quantitative hypothesis. In this example, researchers identified the perceived benefits by conducting post-group interviews with both the children and their guardians and recognized themes involving improved emotion regulation, mood, coping skills, self-esteem, empathy, and ability to focus (Coholic and Eys, 2016). Themes are typically identified and explored in qualitative studies as means to continue redefining their research question Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses Advanced Nursing Research Essay.

Coholic and Eys then utilized quantitative research by using the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents and conducted a hypothesis that children would have improved self-concept and resiliency post-treatment (Coholic and Eys, 2016). The dependent variable includes self-concept and resiliency, where the independent variable is art therapy. Here, quantitative research underlines specific variables attempting to draw a correlation between them. Because the research question is narrow, quantitative measures such as the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale is needed to draw statistical significance and establish a “cause and effect” (Creswell, 2009, p. 132). In contrast, qualitative research only aims to either discover, understand, explore a process, describe experiences, and/or report stories, depending on the type of qualitative research used (Creswell, 2009, p. 131).

References

Coholic, D. A., & Eys, M. (2016). Benefits of an arts-based mindfulness group intervention for vulnerable children. Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal33(1). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10560-015-0431-3

Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research questions and hypotheses. In J. W. Creswell (Author), Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (3rd ed., pp. 129-141). Sage Publications. http://www.gsic.uva.es/~amartine/thai/readings/Creswell2009_ch7-8-9.pdfew profile card for Kathleen Fagan

  • Kathleen Fagan

     

    Sep 26, 2020 10:41 PM

    Brooke,

    Very good comparison of research questions and hypotheses in qualitative and quantitative research.  Interesting research study examples.  Could you elaborate on how objectives fit into this comparison?  Thank you Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses Advanced Nursing Research Essay.

    Dr. Fagan

    <<< Replied to post below >>>
    Authored by: Brooke Welsh
    Authored on: Sep 23, 2020 6:14 PM
    Subject: Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses

    Qualitative research studies differ greatly from quantitative, though sometimes both are combined as a mixed-research study. To start, qualitative studies ask broad questions that will eventually divide into sub-questions, whereas quantitative studies determine specific variables within their hypothesis (Creswell, 2009, p. 129). Qualitative researchers will determine their area of study (ie. perceived benefits of art therapy in vulnerable children) and obtain subjective data from a determined sample size. In a study titled, “Benefits of an Arts-Based Mindfulness Group Intervention for Vulnerable Children,” researchers utilized a mixed-method design and first questioned children between the ages of 8-12 involved with child welfare and mental health services about how art therapy made them feel (Coholic and Eys, 2016). This is a qualitative process to first identify potential sub-questions that would then lead to a quantitative hypothesis. In this example, researchers identified the perceived benefits by conducting post-group interviews with both the children and their guardians and recognized themes involving improved emotion regulation, mood, coping skills, self-esteem, empathy, and ability to focus (Coholic and Eys, 2016). Themes are typically identified and explored in qualitative studies as means to continue redefining their research question.

    Coholic and Eys then utilized quantitative research by using the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents and conducted a hypothesis that children would have improved self-concept and resiliency post-treatment (Coholic and Eys, 2016). The dependent variable includes self-concept and resiliency, where the independent variable is art therapy. Here, quantitative research underlines specific variables attempting to draw a correlation between them. Because the research question is narrow, quantitative measures such as the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale is needed to draw statistical significance and establish a “cause and effect” (Creswell, 2009, p. 132). In contrast, qualitative research only aims to either discover, understand, explore a process, describe experiences, and/or report stories, depending on the type of qualitative research used (Creswell, 2009, p. 131).

    References

    Coholic, D. A., & Eys, M. (2016). Benefits of an arts-based mindfulness group intervention for vulnerable children. Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal33(1). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10560-015-0431-3

    Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research questions and hypotheses. In J. W. Creswell (Author), Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (3rd ed., pp. 129-141). Sage Publications. http://www.gsic.uva.es/~amartine/thai/readings/Creswell2009_ch7-8-9.pdf

  • Brooke Welsh

     

    Sep 27, 2020 7:42 PM

    Dr. Fagan,

    Based on my research, qualitative methods often do not have a defined objective but rather seek answers to broad research questions. The purpose of qualitative research is to describe, provide explanation to, discover, and similar verbiage to imply that qualitative research is explorative and subjective (Creswell, 2009, p. 131). Quantitative data differs greatly in regards to objectives. Within quantitative data, researchers objectives involve around their hypothesis to establish a relationship between specific variables. This can be statistically defined in quantitative research by utilizing measurable tools such as Likert scales and mathematical models pertaining to specified phenomena (Creswell, 2009, p. 133) Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses Advanced Nursing Research Essay.

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    References 

    Coholic, D. A., & Eys, M. (2016). Benefits of an arts-based mindfulness group intervention for vulnerable children. Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal33(1). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10560-015-0431-3

    Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research questions and hypotheses. In J. W. Creswell (Author), Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (3rd ed., pp. 129-141). Sage Publications. http://www.gsic.uva.es/~amartine/thai/readings/Creswell2009_ch7-8-9.pdf

    I hope I have answered your question!

  • Kathleen Fagan

     

    Sep 27, 2020 8:20 PM

    Brooke,

    Good explanation.  Thank you.

    Dr. Fagan

  • Chris Kos

     

    Sep 27, 2020 5:56 PM

    Brooke, thank you for your interesting discussion, I really enjoyed that you touched on mixed-research studies. I had been reading on this a little bit and I really like the idea of combining research methods to include both qualitative and quantitative methods to give us a much more enriched research paper. I believe that the two processes can enhance each other and give a more thorough investigation. Almalki (2016) describes this best as, “Mixed methods approaches are outlined in terms of their challenges and benefits, with the researcher offering a personal opinion in conclusion to the paper. The conclusion that was drawn was that provided that mixed methods research was a suitable approach to any given project, its use would yield positive benefits, in that the use of differing approaches has the potential to provide a greater depth and breadth of information which is not possible utilising singular approaches in isolation”(Almalki, 2016).

    Mixed methods can be complementary in that both words and numbers can give us a much more detailed and thorough paper as they’re able to use both types of data. When working with mixed data we can also work through a paper incrementally working with feedback loops Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses Advanced Nursing Research Essay. For example, we can use quantitative methods to help generate a qualitative hypothesis, and sometimes words can help us clarify, in-depth what our data represents. Finally, we can enhance the understanding and validity of our research using both methods. Using multiple forms of data can significantly enhance the valitidy of our research results (Polit & Cheryl Tatano Beck Dnsc Cnm Faan, 2009). Also, when we’re looking to answer a question, sometimes following one strict method of research will not give us the means to answer that question thoroughly.

     

    References

    Almalki, S. (2016). Integrating quantitative and qualitative data in mixed methods research—challenges and benefits. Journal of Education and Learning5(3), 288. https://doi.org/10.5539/jel.v5n3p288

    Polit, D. F., & Cheryl Tatano Beck Dnsc Cnm Faan. (2009). Essentials of nursing research: Appraising evidence for nursing practice (essentials of nursing research (polit)) (7th ed.). Lww. Quantitative vs. Qualitative Objectives, Questions, or Hypotheses Advanced Nursing Research Essay